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When You Use This Buddhist Meditation Anger Will Stop

Buddhists believe that anger is one of the three poisons that cause rebirth.

Though rebirth might sound like a blessing to many, Buddhists view it differently. To Buddhists, the ultimate achievement is to escape the perpetual cycle of death and rebirth, which they call Samsara. The other two poisons are ignorance and greed.

Of these three poisons, ignorance is the worst. As Tibetologist Jeffrey Hopkins states, “Ignorance is the conception or assumption that phenomena exist in a far more concrete way than they actually do. [This leads] the person to be drawn into afflictive desire and hatred [i.e. attachment and aversion]… Not knowing the real nature of phenomena, we are driven to generate desire for what we like and hatred for what we do not like and for what blocks our desires.”


Ignorance is the root cause of all suffering and is also the root cause of anger. In order to remove anger (and all suffering) we must remove ourselves from ignorance.

To clarify, we must learn to detach ourselves from our ideas of good and bad, right and wrong. We must learn to let go. The manner in which we let go is incredibly simple. At least, it’s incredibly simple in theory. It does take come practice.

The path is through acceptance of things as they are. When we accept things precisely as they are, we free ourselves from ignorance and from suffering.

For example, let’s say we’re angry because we’ve been paid late. In our mind we are apt to think something along the lines of “My pay is late. I won’t make rent. I’ll have to get a loan. That’ll mean I’ll lose money… I’m never going to afford that vacation” and so on. In this situation, we fight to deny reality. We think “I’m not accepting that I’m being paid late.” Buddhists would say that this denial, in itself, is the root cause of suffering.

Paul Martin Harrison

Im on a mission to spread spirituality and enlightenment. How? By writing and teaching. You guys asked me to write a book that will teach you how to meditate properly and how to find enlightenment. Guess what? The book is out now. It's called Welcome To Silence : A Practical Guide To Mindfulness And Meditation.

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